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How to Obtain an HMRC Certificate of Residence for Your Company

Updated: Jun 29

A Certificate of Residence (CoR) is a document that can help you avoid double taxation on foreign income. If you're a UK resident and there's a double taxation agreement with the country in question, you can apply for a CoR. The overseas authority dealing with your claim will usually ask HMRC to certify that you're a UK resident, in line with the double taxation agreement. However, HMRC will not issue a CoR if you're not entitled to treaty benefits under the double taxation agreement. The final decision on relief from foreign taxes is made by the relevant overseas authority.


How to Obtain an HMRC Certificate of Residence for Your Company


The Purpose of a Certificate of Residence

The CoR serves to support claims for benefits under a particular Article of a DTA, which is the Article applicable to the relevant income source. HMRC is committed to providing UK residents with assistance in claiming all the benefits they are entitled to under a DTA. Therefore, HMRC will provide customers with a CoR where, to the best of their knowledge, that customer is a resident of the UK.


Conditions for Issuing a Certificate of Residence

While HMRC is committed to assisting UK residents, it may refuse to issue a CoR where it is clear that the customer would not be entitled to those benefits. This means that there may be cases where a resident of the UK will not be able to obtain a CoR because they do not fulfil the criteria of the particular Article under which they intend to claim benefits. The decision as to whether relief from foreign taxes can be granted is ultimately one to be made by the overseas fiscal authority.


The Role of HMRC in the Issuance of a Certificate of Residence

If HMRC has reason to believe that a customer will not be entitled to benefits, they may request further information from the customer before deciding whether a CoR can be issued. In cases where it is not clear whether a customer would be entitled to benefits, HMRC may decide to make a spontaneous exchange of information with the other state to help them come to an informed decision as to whether benefits can be granted.


Information Required by HMRC

To help HMRC decide whether a CoR can be issued, customers are required to provide a certain amount of information when making their request. The specific information required, the checks HMRC will make, and the circumstances in which a request may be refused are outlined in the following guidance. This guidance replaces the guidance issued on 4 January 2013 and which was previously located at INTM162010 to INTM162040.


When applying for a CoR, you need to provide HMRC with several pieces of information. This includes the reason you need a CoR, the double taxation agreement you want to claim under, the type of income you're claiming for, and the relevant income article. You also need to specify the period you need the CoR for, if different from the date of issue. If required by the double taxation agreement, you must confirm that you're the beneficial owner of the income you're claiming for and that you're subject to UK tax on all of the income you're claiming for.


Application Process for Companies

Companies whose tax affairs are handled by the Large Business Service should send CoR requests using the RES1 online service. For CoR pre-order requests, the Large Business Service accepts requests for CoRs earlier than the end of the accounting period. Companies that need a pre-order should email requests to the Large Business Contact Us Mailbox at: contactus.largebusinesslondon@hmrc.gov.uk. This service is only available for December accounting periods.


Other companies where the Local Compliance deal with their tax affairs should send requests using the RES1 online service. If you need to send HMRC a physical document produced by a foreign tax authority to complete, you can mail one to the Corporation Tax Services office.


Eligibility Criteria for Obtaining a Certificate of Residence

To be eligible for a Certificate of Residence from HMRC, your company must be based in the UK and liable to pay corporation tax. The company should not be considered a tax resident in another country under any tax treaty terms. It's also essential to ensure that all necessary tax returns are up to date, as HMRC will check compliance history before issuing the certificate.


Steps to Apply for an HMRC Certificate of Residence


Step 1: Gather Necessary Documents

Prepare the following documents before you start the application process:


  • Proof of company registration in the UK (such as a certificate of incorporation).

  • Recent corporation tax computations and returns.

  • Evidence of business operations in the UK, like office lease agreements or utility bills.


Step 2: Complete the Application Form

Download and fill out the form DT-Company from the HMRC website. This form requests details about the company’s registration, the nature of its business, and the reasons for requiring the certificate. Ensure accuracy to avoid any delays in processing.


Step 3: Submission of the Application

Submit the completed form along with the necessary supporting documents. This can be done through the HMRC online portal, by mail, or through your company’s tax advisor. When submitting online, ensure that all digital copies of documents are clear and legible.


Step 4: HMRC Review Process

After submission, HMRC will review your application. This process typically takes up to 4 weeks. During this period, HMRC may contact you for additional information or clarification regarding the submitted documents.


Step 5: Receiving the Certificate

Once your application is approved, HMRC will issue the Certificate of Residence. This will be sent either via email in a PDF format or by post, depending on your selected preference during the application. If there are any issues with your application, HMRC will provide specific feedback or requests for additional information.


Using the Certificate of Residence

Once received, the certificate can be presented to foreign tax authorities to prove that your company is a UK tax resident and eligible for benefits under double taxation agreements. This is essential when claiming tax reliefs or exemptions from withholding taxes on income received from foreign sources.


Common Issues and How to Address Them

When applying for a Certificate of Residence, companies may encounter several common issues:


  • Delayed processing times: Ensure all forms are correctly filled and all necessary documentation is attached to avoid delays.

  • Ineligibility due to tax status: If your company is deemed a tax resident in another country, you may need to resolve this before applying.

  • Rejection of applications: Carefully review HMRC’s feedback and rectify any deficiencies in your application or documents.


Renewing Your Certificate of Residence

A Certificate of Residence is typically valid for one fiscal year. If your company continues to engage in international transactions, it will be necessary to renew this certificate annually. The renewal process follows the same steps as the initial application, requiring up-to-date documentation and compliance with UK tax obligations.

By understanding and following these steps, UK companies can efficiently obtain an HMRC Certificate of Residence, facilitating smoother international business operations and ensuring compliance with global tax obligations.


The Provision of a Certificate of Residence and Its Implications

Customers should be aware that the provision of a CoR will not guarantee that they will be successful in their claim to benefits under the relevant DTA. It will be up to the overseas fiscal authority to determine whether the customer fulfils all the relevant conditions and whether benefits can be granted. However, if a customer believes an overseas fiscal authority has denied them benefits to which they should be entitled to, HMRC will consider engaging with those authorities on the customers' behalf under the Mutual Agreement Procedure for the relevant DTA.


Updates

companies in the UK still use the RES1 form when applying for a Certificate of Residence from HMRC. This form is accessible through the HMRC's online service and is applicable to different entities including companies, partnerships, and certain pension schemes under various circumstances. When dealing with HMRC, companies that fall under the Large Business Service have specific procedures and might even be able to request certificates in advance of their accounting period's end, particularly if their accounting period ends in DecemberThe links to the RES1 form have been updated to the online RES1 form.



Different Forms to Obtain an HMRC Certificate of Residence for Your Company

A Certificate of Residence (CoR) is a crucial document that can help you avoid double taxation on foreign income. The process of obtaining a CoR involves different forms depending on the type of entity making the application. This article provides a comprehensive guide on the different forms used to get an HMRC Certificate of Residence for your company.


Individuals and Sole Traders

Individuals and sole traders can apply for a CoR using the online service provided by HMRC. If the foreign country provides a form to certify residence, this form should be sent to the Pay As You Earn and Self-Assessment Department of HMRC.


Companies

Companies whose tax affairs are handled by the Large Business Service should send CoR requests using the RES1 online service. For CoR pre-order requests, the Large Business Service accepts requests for CoRs earlier than the end of the accounting period. Companies that need a pre-order should email requests to the Large Business Contact Us Mailbox.


Companies where the Local Compliance deal with their tax affairs should also send requests using the RES1 online service. If a physical document produced by a foreign tax authority needs to be completed, it can be mailed to the Corporation Tax Services office.


Partnerships

Partnerships, including Lloyd’s syndicates, should use the online RES1 form for requests. If the partnership has a Customer Compliance Manager or Customer Coordinator in Large Business, requests should be sent to them. Otherwise, requests should be sent to the Pay As You Earn and Self Assessment Department of HMRC.


Registered Pension Schemes

Registered pension schemes should use form APSS 146E and send it to the address on the form. If the foreign country provides a form to certify residence, it should be sent to HMRC with the form APSS 146E.


Insurance Companies and Unit Trusts

Insurance companies should send requests to the company’s Customer Compliance Manager or Corporation Tax Services office responsible for handling the company’s tax affairs. Unit trusts should use form CISC9 and send it to the HMRC Collective Investment Schemes Centre.


Non-registered Pension Schemes

Non-registered pension schemes should send requests to Trusts and Estates at HMRC.


Collective Investment Schemes

Collective investment schemes should use form CISC9 and send it to the address on the form. If the foreign country has given a form to certify residence, it should be sent with the form CISC9.


Trusts and Charities

Trusts should write to HMRC at the Trusts department, while charities should write to the Charities, Savings and International 2 department of HMRC.


Public Bodies

Public bodies should use the online RES1 form for requests and send reclaim forms for certification to the Corporation Tax Services office.


Obtaining a Certificate of Residence can be a crucial step for companies operating internationally to avoid double taxation. It's important to understand the requirements and process to apply for a CoR from HMRC. If you need more information, you can find it in HMRC’s International manual.



Case Study: Obtaining an HMRC Certificate of Residence for a UK Company


In this case study, we follow Oliver Grant, the director of Grantech Innovations Ltd., a software development company based in Manchester. Oliver needs to obtain a Certificate of Residence (CoR) from HMRC to claim tax relief on income received from clients in Germany, which has a double taxation agreement with the UK.


Background Scenario

Grantech Innovations Ltd. has recently expanded its services to the European market, with several contracts in Germany. To avoid being taxed both in the UK and Germany on the same income, Oliver needs to provide a CoR to his German clients.


Steps for Obtaining the Certificate


Understanding the Requirement

  • A CoR is required to prove that Grantech Innovations is a UK resident company for tax purposes, allowing it to claim tax relief under the UK-Germany Double Taxation Agreement.


Gathering Necessary Information

  • Oliver needs to gather essential information such as the company's Unique Tax Reference (UTR), the address, the reason for the application (to claim tax relief under a double taxation agreement), details about the type of income, and the specific period for which the certificate is required.


Application Process

  • The application can be completed using the HMRC’s RES1 online service. For larger companies dealt by the Large Business Service, Oliver can send an early request if the company's accounting period ends in December.


Documentation

  • If required, Oliver must send any physical documents produced by the foreign tax authority to HMRC at their Corporation Tax Services office.


Submission

  • After gathering all the necessary information and completing the RES1 form, Oliver submits his application via the online platform. He ensures all details are accurate to avoid any delays.


Waiting Period

  • The processing time can vary, but typically, Oliver can expect to receive the certificate within 4 to 8 weeks, depending on the complexity of the application and HMRC’s workload.


Receiving the Certificate

  • Once approved, the certificate confirms that Grantech Innovations is a UK tax resident for the specified period, which Oliver can then present to his clients and the German tax authority to ensure the income received is not subject to double taxation.


Real-life Implications

By obtaining the CoR, Oliver not only ensures compliance with international tax laws but also optimizes his company’s tax obligations, significantly reducing the tax burden. This strategic approach helps in maintaining profitability while legally minimizing tax liabilities.


For UK companies like Grantech Innovations, navigating the complexities of international tax agreements is crucial. Obtaining a Certificate of Residence is an essential step for companies dealing with clients in countries where double taxation agreements are in place. This certificate serves as a key tool in international tax planning, ensuring that businesses can operate across borders more effectively and efficiently.


The Role of a Tax Accountant in Securing an HMRC Certificate of Residence for Your Company


The Role of a Tax Accountant in Securing an HMRC Certificate of Residence for Your Company

A Certificate of Residence (CoR) is a crucial document for companies operating internationally. It helps to avoid double taxation on foreign income by certifying that the company is a resident in the UK for tax purposes. A tax accountant can play a significant role in helping a company secure this certificate from HM Revenue and Customs (HMRC). This article explores how a tax accountant can assist in this process.


Understanding the Requirements

One of the primary ways a tax accountant can assist is by helping the company understand the requirements for obtaining a CoR. They can explain the conditions under which a CoR can be issued, such as the need for a double taxation agreement with the foreign country concerned and the company's tax residency status in the UK. They can also guide the company on the specific information HMRC requires when applying for a CoR.


Preparing and Submitting the Application

A tax accountant can help prepare and submit the application for a CoR. This involves filling out the appropriate forms, such as the RES1 online form for companies, and providing the necessary information. The accountant can ensure that all the details are accurately filled out and that all required documents are included in the application.


Liaising with HMRC

Tax accountants can liaise directly with HMRC on behalf of the company. They can handle any correspondence, respond to queries, and provide additional information if required. This can be particularly helpful if HMRC requests further information before deciding whether a CoR can be issued.


Advising on Tax Implications

A tax accountant can provide advice on the tax implications of obtaining a CoR. They can explain how the CoR can be used to claim relief from certain foreign taxes and how it affects the company's overall tax liability. They can also advise on the potential consequences if the company is not able to obtain a CoR.


Assisting with Disputes

In the event that a CoR application is denied, or if there are disputes with foreign tax authorities, a tax accountant can provide valuable assistance. They can help the company understand the reasons for the denial, explore possible avenues for appeal, and liaise with foreign tax authorities if necessary.



Securing a Certificate of Residence from HMRC is a crucial step for companies operating internationally to avoid double taxation. A tax accountant can provide invaluable assistance throughout this process, from understanding the requirements and preparing the application, to liaising with HMRC and advising on tax implications. Their expertise can help ensure that the process goes smoothly and that the company can claim all the benefits it is entitled to under the relevant Double Taxation Agreement.


FAQs


1. How long does it take to receive a Certificate of Residence from HMRC?

The processing time for a Certificate of Residence can vary, typically taking several weeks depending on HMRC’s workload and the complexity of the request.


2. Can a Certificate of Residence be used for multiple foreign countries simultaneously?

No, a separate Certificate of Residence must be obtained for each foreign country where tax relief is being claimed.


3. What is the validity period of a Certificate of Residence?

The validity of a Certificate of Residence generally depends on the duration specified in the request and the requirements of the foreign tax authority.


4. Can I apply for a Certificate of Residence if I have dual residency?

Yes, but it may require additional documentation to prove primary residency status in the UK for the purposes of the double taxation agreement.


5. What should I do if my Certificate of Residence application is rejected?

You can appeal the decision by providing additional information or evidence to support your claim or seek assistance from a tax advisor.


6. Do I need a tax accountant to apply for a Certificate of Residence?

While not required, a tax accountant can help ensure that the application is correctly completed and all necessary documentation is provided.


7. Can non-resident companies apply for a Certificate of Residence in the UK?

No, only companies and individuals that are tax residents in the UK can apply for a Certificate of Residence.


8. Is there a fee for obtaining a Certificate of Residence from HMRC?

No, HMRC does not charge a fee for issuing a Certificate of Residence.


9. How often should I renew my Certificate of Residence?

Renewal frequency depends on the requirements of the foreign tax authority; typically, it is renewed annually or as needed for ongoing claims.


10. Can I request a Certificate of Residence for past tax years?

Yes, you can request a Certificate of Residence for previous tax years if you need to claim tax relief for those periods.


11. What happens if there is a change in my residency status after receiving the Certificate of Residence?

You should notify HMRC and the relevant foreign tax authority of any changes in your residency status that may affect your tax obligations.


12. Can a Certificate of Residence be used as proof of address?

No, a Certificate of Residence is intended solely for tax purposes and is not valid as proof of address.


13. What documentation is needed to apply for a Certificate of Residence?

Documentation typically includes proof of UK residency, details of the double taxation agreement, and specifics about the income being claimed for relief.


14. How do I track the status of my Certificate of Residence application?

You can contact HMRC directly or check through your HMRC online account if you submitted the application electronically.


15. Are there any restrictions on the type of income that can be covered by a Certificate of Residence?

Yes, the income must fall under the provisions of the relevant double taxation agreement and typically includes dividends, interest, royalties, and employment income.


16. Can a Certificate of Residence be issued retroactively?

Yes, HMRC can issue a Certificate of Residence retroactively if the request is properly justified and documented.


17. How does Brexit affect the issuance of Certificates of Residence?

Brexit does not directly affect the issuance of Certificates of Residence, but it may impact tax treaties with EU countries, requiring updated agreements.


18. What are the consequences of providing incorrect information in a Certificate of Residence application?

Providing incorrect information can lead to the rejection of the application, penalties, and potential legal issues.


19. Can I authorize someone else to apply for a Certificate of Residence on my behalf?

Yes, you can authorize a tax advisor or accountant to apply on your behalf by providing them with the necessary authorization documents.


20. How does the double taxation agreement impact the benefits of a Certificate of Residence?

The double taxation agreement specifies the tax relief benefits available, and the Certificate of Residence confirms eligibility for these benefits under the agreement.






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