top of page
  • Writer's pictureMAZ

What is HMRC NRL6 Form?

 

The HMRC NRL6 Form, titled "Certificate of Tax Liability to be Provided to Non-Resident Landlords by UK Letting Agents or Tenants," is a document used in the UK to record the tax deducted from the rental income of landlords residing outside the UK. This form is part of the Non-Resident Landlord Scheme (NRLS) and is issued by letting agents or tenants who deduct tax from the rental payments. It serves as a formal statement of the tax amount withheld and is essential for tax compliance and reconciliation for non-resident landlords.

 


What is HMRC NRL6 Form


Understanding HMRC NRL6 Form in the UK

The HMRC NRL6 form is an integral part of the Non-Resident Landlord Scheme (NRLS) in the United Kingdom. This article aims to provide a comprehensive understanding of the NRL6 form and its relevance within the NRLS. The NRLS is a system implemented by HMRC to manage the taxation of rental income received by landlords who reside outside the UK for more than six months a year. This scheme affects various stakeholders, including non-resident landlords, tenants, and letting agents.

 

Who Qualifies as a Non-Resident Landlord?

A non-resident landlord is defined as a person or entity (which can include companies, trustees, or partnerships) who owns and rents out property in the UK but lives abroad for more than six months in any tax year. Notably, one can be considered a UK resident for general tax purposes yet still be recognized as a non-resident under the NRLS​​.

 

The Purpose of NRL6 Form

The NRL6 form, officially titled "Certificate of Tax Liability to be Provided to Non-Resident Landlords by UK Letting Agents or Tenants," is used by UK letting agents or tenants who have deducted tax from the rental income of a landlord based outside the UK. This form serves as a certificate of tax liability, indicating the amount of tax deducted from the rental income before it's forwarded to the non-resident landlord. The NRL6 must be issued to the landlord, and a copy must be retained for HMRC audit purposes.

 

Operation of NRLS and Role of NRL6

Under the NRLS, when a non-resident landlord rents out property in the UK, the tenant or letting agent is legally obligated to deduct tax at the basic rate (currently 20%) from the rental income and pay it to HMRC. This tax deduction and payment occur quarterly. The landlord is then provided with an NRL6 certificate by the tenant or letting agent, usually by July 5th each year. The certificate details the amount of tax paid on their behalf. The NRL6 form is pivotal in ensuring compliance with the NRLS regulations and in providing transparency in the tax liabilities and payments made​​.

 

Compliance and Penalties

Adherence to the NRLS and accurate completion of the NRL6 form is crucial. Failure to comply can result in significant penalties. Both tenants and letting agents must maintain records of rent paid, expenses, and correspondence related to the landlord's residence status for four years. Incorrect reporting or failure to comply with the NRLS requirements can lead to fines, emphasizing the importance of understanding and correctly executing responsibilities under the scheme​​.

 

Applying for Gross Rent Payment

Non-resident landlords can apply to receive their rental income gross, i.e., without tax deduction at source. This is feasible if their UK tax affairs are up-to-date, they have no outstanding UK tax commitments, or they don't anticipate being liable for UK income tax in the year of application. Forms NRL1 (for individuals), NRL2 (for companies), and NRL3 (for trusts and estates) are used for this purpose. Approval of this application changes the tax handling process, impacting the role of NRL6.

 

Responsibilities of Letting Agents

Letting agents managing properties for non-resident landlords are mandated to adhere to the NRLS. This includes registering with HMRC via the NRL4 form, operating the scheme, and fulfilling the obligations such as deducting tax, submitting quarterly returns, and issuing NRL6 certificates. Their role is crucial in ensuring the proper management and reporting of rental income and tax for non-resident landlords.



Understanding the Uses of NRL6 Form in the UK

The "Certificate of Tax Liability to be Provided to Non-Resident Landlords by UK Letting Agents or Tenants" (NRL6 Form) is a crucial document in the UK’s taxation framework, especially under the Non-Resident Landlord Scheme (NRLS). This form serves multiple purposes, bridging the gap between tax compliance and operational transparency for non-resident landlords, letting agents, and tenants.

 

1. Compliance with the Non-Resident Landlord Scheme

The NRL6 form is integral to the NRLS, a scheme established by HM Revenue & Customs (HMRC) to regulate the taxation of rental income earned from UK properties by landlords residing outside the UK. The NRL6 form ensures compliance with this scheme by documenting the tax deducted from rental income before it is passed on to non-resident landlords. This form acts as a tangible record of the tax withheld and paid to HMRC, which is crucial in maintaining transparency and adherence to the tax laws.

 

2. Certificate of Tax Deduction for Landlords

For non-resident landlords, the NRL6 form serves as an official certificate showing the amount of tax deducted from their rental income by their letting agents or tenants. This certificate is crucial for landlords to understand the exact amount of tax paid on their behalf. It aids in reconciling their tax liabilities when they file their tax returns in the UK or their country of residence.

 

3. Aid in Tax Filing and Reconciliation

The information on the NRL6 form is vital for non-resident landlords when they file their Self-Assessment Tax Returns in the UK. It provides a breakdown of the income received and the tax deducted, which can be used to claim any excess tax paid. This form simplifies the process of tax reconciliation for landlords, ensuring they are taxed only on their net rental income after legitimate deductions.

 

4. Record-Keeping for Audit and Verification

The NRL6 form acts as an essential record for both the landlords and the letting agents or tenants. HMRC may require these forms during audits or verifications to ensure that the correct amount of tax has been deducted and reported. Retaining copies of the NRL6 form helps in validating the accuracy of tax payments and compliance with tax laws.

 

5. Transparency and Trust in Landlord-Tenant Relationships

By providing a clear and official statement of the tax deducted, the NRL6 form helps in maintaining transparency between non-resident landlords and their tenants or letting agents. This transparency is crucial in building trust and ensuring that all parties are aware of their financial and legal responsibilities.

 

6. Facilitating Tax Adjustments and Refunds

If a non-resident landlord is eligible for a tax refund or adjustment, the NRL6 form provides the necessary evidence for the amount of tax already paid. This is particularly important if the landlord's total taxable income in the UK falls below their personal allowance, making them eligible for a refund of the tax withheld.

 

7. Legal Evidence in Disputes or Misunderstandings

In case of any disputes or misunderstandings related to rental income tax deductions, the NRL6 form serves as legal evidence. It can be used in legal proceedings to prove that the tenant or letting agent has complied with the NRLS requirements, thereby protecting them from potential penalties or legal issues.

 

8. Simplifying Tax Management for Letting Agents and Tenants

For letting agents and tenants who are responsible for managing properties on behalf of non-resident landlords, the NRL6 form simplifies the process of tax management. It provides a structured and government-approved format for reporting the tax deducted, making it easier to manage their obligations under the NRLS.

 

9. Supporting International Tax Agreements

For non-resident landlords who are subject to tax in multiple jurisdictions, the NRL6 form can be used to support claims under international tax agreements or double taxation relief. It provides documented proof of tax paid in the UK, which can be crucial when seeking tax relief or credit in another country.

 

10. Enhancing Overall Tax System Efficiency

The NRL6 form contributes to the overall efficiency of the UK’s tax system. By standardizing the process of reporting and documenting tax deductions for non-resident landlords, it helps HMRC in efficiently managing and tracking tax liabilities and payments, ultimately contributing to the smooth functioning of the tax system.


In short, the NRL6 form is a vital instrument in the UK’s tax administration, especially concerning the Non-Resident Landlord Scheme. Its multiple uses range from ensuring compliance with tax laws to aiding in tax filing, maintaining transparency, and supporting the efficient management of tax obligations for all parties involved.



Detailed Guide to Filling Out NRL6 Form and Compliance Procedures

In this second part of our comprehensive guide on the HMRC NRL6 form, we will explore the detailed procedure for filling out the form, compliance requirements, and tax calculations for non-resident landlords in the UK. NRL6 Form can be filled out online on the HMRC website.

 

Filling Out the NRL6 Form

 

  1. Who Needs to Complete NRL6: The NRL6 form is specifically for UK letting agents or tenants who have deducted tax from the rental income of a non-resident landlord. This form acts as a certificate of tax liability.

  2. Information Required: To complete NRL6, you need to gather all relevant information about the rental income and tax deductions. It's crucial to fill in the form fully before printing, as partially completed forms cannot be saved.

  3. Issuing the Certificate: After completing NRL6, the letting agent or tenant must provide the certificate to the non-resident landlord and keep a copy for HMRC audit purposes.

 

Compliance and Reporting

 

  1. Quarterly Tax Payments: Tenants or letting agents must calculate and pay tax to HMRC within 30 days at the end of each quarter. The quarters end on June 30, September 30, December 31, and March 31.

  2. Annual Reporting: A report must be sent to HMRC and the non-resident landlord annually by July 5th using form NRLY, along with the NRL6 certificate.

  3. Record Keeping: It is mandatory to keep records for four years, including rent paid, expenses, and correspondence related to the landlord's residence status.

 

Tax Calculation and Deductions

 

  1. Rental Income: Rental income includes a variety of receipts from land and property, such as income from letting furnished or unfurnished premises, ground rents, and income from letting land for specific uses.

  2. Deductible Expenses: When calculating tax due, deductible expenses paid on behalf of the landlord can be subtracted. These include expenses incurred wholly and exclusively for the rental business and are not of a ‘capital’ nature.

  3. Calculating Tax: To calculate the tax, add up the total rent, including any payments made to third parties at the landlord's request. Then, deduct any allowable expenses to get the net rent. Multiply this by the basic rate of Income Tax (currently 20%)​.

 

Exemptions and Applying for Gross Rent

 

  1. Applying for Exemption: Non-resident landlords who do not want tax deductions can apply for gross rent payment by filing the NRL1 form. HMRC will require information such as the length of time the landlord will live outside the UK and their tax compliance history​​.

  2. Eligibility for Gross Rent Payment: To be eligible, landlords must ensure their UK tax affairs are up-to-date, have no outstanding UK tax obligations, or expect to be below the tax liability threshold for the year.

  3. Impact on NRL6 Form: If the exemption is granted, the letting agent or tenant will remit the full rental income to the landlord without tax deductions, thereby changing the NRL6 form's applicability.

 

Penalties for Non-Compliance

Non-compliance with the NRLS, including failure to correctly complete and submit the NRL6 form, can lead to significant fines. It's essential for all parties involved—landlords, tenants, and letting agents—to understand and adhere to their obligations under the scheme to avoid these penalties.

 


Implications for Non-Resident Landlords and Key Considerations

In the final part of our series on the HMRC NRL6 form in the UK, we delve into the broader implications of the Non-Resident Landlord Scheme (NRLS) for non-resident landlords, including tax considerations, obligations, and the application process for receiving rental income without tax deduction.

 

Tax Implications for Non-Resident Landlords

 

  1. Scope of Taxation: Non-resident landlords, defined as individuals or entities (including companies and trusts) who own property in the UK but live abroad for more than six months annually, are subject to UK income tax on their UK rental income. This taxation applies even if the rent is paid into an overseas bank account​​.

  2. Tax Deduction Responsibilities: Under the NRLS, tenants or letting agents are required to withhold tax at the basic rate (currently 20%) on the rental income paid to non-resident landlords unless the landlord has obtained approval to receive their rent in full​​.

  3. Self-Assessment Tax Return: Non-resident landlords who are registered under the NRLS and receive their rent in full are responsible for declaring their income and settling their tax liability through a UK Self-Assessment Tax Return.

 

Registration and Approval Process

 

  1. Applying for Gross Rental Income: Non-resident landlords who wish to receive their rental income without tax deduction at source must apply to HMRC using one of the forms (NRL1i for individuals, NRL2i for companies, NRL3i for trustees)​​.

  2. Eligibility Criteria: Approval is granted if the landlord’s UK tax affairs are up-to-date, they have never had UK tax obligations, or they do not anticipate being liable for UK tax in the year of application.

  3. Timing of Application: Applications should be made no more than three months before leaving the UK or immediately if the usual place of abode is already outside the UK.

 

Tax Compliance and Deductions

 

  1. Deductible Expenses: When calculating tax, deductible expenses paid on behalf of the landlord, such as maintenance costs and insurance, can be subtracted. These expenses must be incurred wholly and exclusively for the rental business and not be of a capital nature.

  2. Record Keeping: Tenants and letting agents must maintain detailed records, including rent paid, expenses, and correspondence related to the landlord's residence status, for four years.

  3. Reporting Requirements: Annual reports using form NRLY and NRL6 must be submitted to HMRC and the landlord by July 5th each year.

  4. VAT Considerations: The deductible expense amount should include VAT, if applicable.

  5. Personal Allowance: Non-resident landlords can claim a personal allowance of £12,570 (for 2022/23), deductible from their profit before regular income tax rates are applied to the rental income.

 

Key Takeaways for Non-Resident Landlords

 

  • Compliance with NRLS: Understanding and adhering to the NRLS rules is crucial to avoid penalties.

  • Seeking Approval for Gross Rent: Applying for approval to receive rental income without tax deduction can simplify tax management.

  • Accurate Record Keeping: Maintaining thorough records of all rental income and expenses is vital for compliance.

  • Tax Return Filings: Filing a Self-Assessment Tax Return is necessary for landlords receiving rental income in full.

 

The NRLS and the NRL6 form play a critical role in ensuring tax compliance for non-resident landlords in the UK. By understanding their responsibilities, tax calculation methods, and the process for applying for gross rental income, non-resident landlords can effectively navigate the complexities of the UK tax system. This comprehensive guide aims to assist non-resident landlords, tenants, and letting agents in understanding and fulfilling their obligations under the NRLS.


What Is the Connection Between NRL6 Form and Other NRL Forms

The NRL6 Form and other NRL Forms (NRL1, NRL2, NRL3) are all integral components of the UK's Non-Resident Landlord Scheme (NRLS), each serving a specific function within the scheme. Here's how they are interconnected:


  1. NRL1, NRL2, and NRL3 Forms:

  • Purpose: These forms are applications for non-resident landlords to receive their UK rental income without deduction of UK tax at source.

  • Applicants:

  • NRL1: Used by individual landlords who are non-residents.

  • NRL2: For non-resident companies that receive rental income from UK properties.

  • NRL3: For non-resident trustees or estates.

  • Function: By completing these forms, non-resident landlords can apply to HMRC to have their rental income paid directly to them without the tenant or letting agent deducting tax. If approved, they handle their tax obligations through the Self-Assessment tax process.

  1. NRL6 Form:

  • Purpose: The NRL6 Form is a certificate of tax liability that UK letting agents or tenants provide to non-resident landlords when tax has been deducted from their rental income.

  • Function: This form acts as a record of the tax amount withheld from the rental income before it is paid to the non-resident landlord. It's used for tax reporting and reconciliation by the landlord.

  • Connection with NRL1, NRL2, and NRL3: The need for issuing an NRL6 arises only when a non-resident landlord has not been approved under the NRL1, NRL2, or NRL3 forms to receive their rental income gross. If the landlord is approved to receive rental income without tax deduction, the NRL6 is not required, as no tax is being withheld by the letting agents or tenants.


Thus while the NRL1, NRL2, and NRL3 forms are applications by non-resident landlords to receive rental income without tax deduction at source, the NRL6 form is a certificate issued when tax is deducted. The relationship between these forms lies in the management of tax on rental income earned by non-resident landlords in the UK. Approval through NRL1, NRL2, or NRL3 negates the need for the NRL6 form, as no tax would be withheld that requires documentation.

 


The Role of a Landlord Tax Accountant in Managing NRL6 Form for Non-Resident Landlords


The Role of a Landlord Tax Accountant in Managing NRL6 Form for Non-Resident Landlords

A landlord tax accountant plays a pivotal role in assisting non-resident landlords in the UK, particularly concerning the "Certificate of Tax Liability to be Provided to Non-Resident Landlords by UK Letting Agents or Tenants" (NRL6 Form). This article explores the various ways in which a landlord tax accountant can provide invaluable assistance.

 

Understanding the NRL6 Form and NRLS Compliance

 

  1. Expert Guidance on NRLS: A landlord tax accountant has specialized knowledge of the Non-Resident Landlord Scheme (NRLS). They can educate non-resident landlords about their tax obligations under this scheme, explaining the necessity and usage of the NRL6 form for compliance.

  2. Clarifying the Role of NRL6: Landlords may not be familiar with the specific function and significance of the NRL6 form. A tax accountant can explain its role as a certificate indicating the tax deducted from their UK rental income by letting agents or tenants.

 

Assistance in Tax Filing and Reconciliation

 

  1. Utilizing NRL6 for Tax Returns: The NRL6 form is crucial when non-resident landlords file their Self-Assessment Tax Returns in the UK. A tax accountant can use the details from this form to accurately report rental income and tax deducted, ensuring proper tax filing.

  2. Reconciliation of Tax Payments: By analyzing the NRL6 form, a landlord tax accountant can reconcile any discrepancies between the tax deducted at source and the actual tax liability, potentially leading to tax adjustments or refunds.

 

Ensuring Compliance and Accuracy

 

  1. Verification of NRL6 Details: Landlord tax accountants can verify the accuracy of the information on NRL6 forms provided by letting agents or tenants, ensuring compliance with HMRC requirements.

  2. Maintaining Records for HMRC Audits: The NRL6 form must be accurately filled and maintained for potential HMRC audits. A tax accountant ensures that all records are kept in order and readily available if required.

 

Advisory on Tax Deductions and Allowances

 

  1. Advice on Deductible Expenses: A significant aspect of managing rental income tax involves understanding which expenses are deductible. A landlord tax accountant can advise on allowable expenses that can be deducted from the rental income before tax calculation.

  2. Maximizing Tax Efficiency: Expert tax accountants can provide strategic advice on how to structure rental income and expenses for optimal tax efficiency, potentially leading to significant savings.

 

Handling Complex Tax Situations

 

  1. International Tax Implications: For landlords who are subject to tax in multiple jurisdictions, a tax accountant can provide guidance on international tax agreements and how to avoid double taxation, using the NRL6 form as a supporting document.

  2. Dealing with Jointly Owned Properties: In cases of jointly owned properties, tax accountants can assist in determining how the income and tax liability should be split, as per the provisions of the NRLS.

 

Assistance with Gross Rent Application

 

  1. Applying for Gross Rental Income: If a non-resident landlord prefers to receive their rental income without tax deduction at source, a tax accountant can assist in the application process, ensuring that all the criteria and documentation are properly met.

  2. Liaising with HMRC: They can act as intermediaries between the landlord and HMRC, handling communications and clarifications regarding the NRL6 form and other tax-related matters.

 

Ongoing Tax Consultation and Updates

 

  1. Providing Regular Tax Updates: Tax laws and regulations can change. A landlord tax accountant stays updated on these changes and informs landlords about how these may affect their rental income and tax liabilities.

  2. Strategic Tax Planning: They can provide ongoing strategic planning advice, helping landlords make informed decisions about their property investments and tax positions over the long term.

In conclusion, a landlord tax accountant is indispensable for non-resident landlords in navigating the complexities of the UK tax system, particularly regarding the NRL6 form. Their expertise ensures compliance, optimizes tax efficiency, and provides peace of mind to landlords in managing their tax obligations effectively.



FAQs

 

Q1: What specific information is required on the NRL6 Form?

A: The NRL6 Form requires details of the non-resident landlord, the property, the rental income received, and the tax deducted.


Q2: Is NRL6 Form applicable to short-term rentals?

A: Yes, if the property owner is a non-resident landlord, NRL6 applies to all rental income, including short-term rentals.


Q3: How does NRL6 Form impact joint property owners?

A: For jointly owned properties, each non-resident landlord must be issued an NRL6 Form showing their share of the income and tax deducted.


Q4: Are there penalties for not issuing NRL6 Form?

A: Yes, failure to issue NRL6 Form can lead to penalties from HMRC for non-compliance with the NRLS.


Q5: Can NRL6 Form be submitted electronically?

A: As of my last update, the NRL6 Form typically needs to be completed in paper format, but it’s best to check the latest HMRC guidelines.


Q6: Is NRL6 required for non-resident corporate landlords?

A: Yes, NRL6 is applicable to all non-resident landlords, including individuals, companies, and trusts.


Q7: How does NRL6 Form affect tax filing in other countries?

A: The NRL6 Form may be used to claim foreign tax credit in the landlord's resident country, but local tax laws and treaties should be consulted.


Q8: Can a non-resident landlord request not to have tax deducted?

A: Yes, they can apply to receive rental income without deduction of tax, but until approved, NRL6 is still required.


Q9: Is NRL6 relevant for landlords under the UK personal allowance threshold?

A: Yes, it's relevant for all non-resident landlords regardless of their income level.


Q10: Does NRL6 cover service charges and ground rent?

A: Yes, if these are part of the taxable rental income.


Q11: How long should records of NRL6 Forms be kept?

A: HMRC recommends keeping records for at least 6 years.


Q12: What if the NRL6 Form details are incorrect?

A: Incorrect details should be rectified immediately and reported to HMRC.


Q13: Are non-resident landlords with UK tax agents exempt from NRL6?

A: No, NRL6 is independent of whether a landlord has a UK tax agent.


Q14: Does NRL6 Form apply to rental income paid to offshore accounts?

A: Yes, it applies to all UK rental income regardless of where it is paid.


Q15: Can NRL6 Form be amended once submitted?

A: Yes, amendments can be made, but they should be promptly communicated to HMRC.


Q16: How is NRL6 Form related to NRL1, NRL2, and NRL3 forms?

A: NRL6 is a certificate of tax liability, while NRL1, NRL2, and NRL3 are applications by landlords to receive rental income without tax deduction.


Q17: What happens if there's a delay in issuing NRL6?

A: Delays should be avoided as they can result in non-compliance penalties.


Q18: Does NRL6 need to be filed if no tax is deducted?

A: If no tax is deducted under NRLS, NRL6 may not be necessary, but this should be confirmed with HMRC.


Q19: Are there exceptions to who needs to file NRL6?

A: Generally, all letting agents or tenants paying rent to non-resident landlords must comply, unless exempted by HMRC.


Q20: Can NRL6 be used for multiple properties?

A: No, each property requires a separate NRL6 Form.



 

235 views0 comments

Comments


bottom of page